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  Re: Dietary Change for Crystals in Cat

Tue, 19 Jul 16 10:15:18 -0700
Posted by Frances (Detroit, Mi) on 07/19/2016

My 9 year old boy has had a recurring problem with blockage in the past six months. The first time he had to go to the vet and get a catheter and an IV and stay overnight. It cost us something like $500. I noticed a few weeks ago he started to urinate outside the box and had pink colored urine which I assume is a little blood. So I was afraid the blockage was coming back again. I went online frantically reading everything I could. I have found that baking soda works well for human UTI so I tried it with him and it seemed to help him for the few days until I received my cat Cancer Treatment from Pet Well-being. It's a dark colored liquid kind of like tea and it comes with a dropper. It helps with every kind of problem. Since I did the baking soda and the cat Cancer Treatments, he has been his regular old self again. No peeing outside of the box and no more blood that I've noticed. I hope this helps because it's scary when they can't tell you what's wrong.

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  Re: Blue Kote for Tumors

Tue, 19 Jul 16 08:20:35 -0700
Posted by Diane (Southern Ca.) on 07/19/2016

Patricia, I just now found out you can't use Blu Kote on cats. It can be harmful to cats.

Hydrogen Peroxide is OK for cats on wounds.

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090711181831AAJzcNF

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  Re: Apple Cider Vinegar for Fleas Not Working

Tue, 19 Jul 16 08:19:20 -0700
Posted by Theresa Donate
(Mpls., Mn) on 07/19/2016

Hey Terryann,

If the fleas are impervious to the smell of the ACV, you might try a cedar oil spray or other insect repelling essential oils.

Ideas:

  • Apple Cider Vinegar – The smell of vinegar alone, is enough to repel a mosquito, but apple cider vinegar is more than just a repellent. It is a natural conditioner to the skin and hair. It is also great for adding shine and luster to the coat. A really great way to utilize ACV to repel bugs, is to steep apple cider vinegar in rosemary, lavender, neem leaf, and/or other bug repelling herbs for two weeks, shaking the jar daily. Strain herbs from the ACV and spray onto your dog. Allow to dry and do not rinse! Works great on people too and is safe on and around children as well.
  • Essential Oils – There are many essential oils that help repel all sorts of bugs and are safe to use in dog sprays! You can substitute these essential oils into your dog's homemade Flea & Tick spray, based off of what you have on hand. PLEASE REMEMBER – dogs should be thought of like babies when it comes to essential oils and the amount to use. Not only do they have sensitive noses but they also have smaller organs than we do. Some of the essential oils you can safely use on dogs for flea and tick prevention are: lavender, lemon, citronella, sage/clary sage, bergamot, cedarwood, lemon eucalyptus, lemongrass, peppermint, geranium, sweet orange, and rosemary.

Source: http://www.thehippyhomemaker.com/diy-natural-flea-tick-spray/

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  Re: Apple Cider Vinegar for Fleas

Tue, 19 Jul 16 08:18:17 -0700
Posted by Theresa Donate
(Mpls., Mn) on 07/19/2016

Hey Barbara,

I have no experience with using baking soda, salt or borax in dry applications, so cannot comment there. I just wanted to agree with your vet - vacuuming daily is key to staying on top of an infestation, as well as daily washing of the bedding. Also, place those lamp traps in the heavy traffic areas and by the kitty beds. Please report back!

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  Re: Blue Kote for Tumors

Tue, 19 Jul 16 08:16:56 -0700
Posted by Theresa Donate
(Mpls., Mn) on 07/19/2016

Hey Diane,

Per the wiki page: Blu Kote contains "Acriflavine has been shown to have anti-cancer activity by inhibition of HIF-1 which prevents blood vessels growing to supply tumors with blood and interferes with glucose uptake and use."

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  Re: Blue Kote for Tumors

Tue, 19 Jul 16 08:15:48 -0700
Posted by Theresa Donate
(Mpls., Mn) on 07/19/2016

FYI Blu Kote is commonly available at farm supply or fleet farm type stores, though you may find it in walmart and the like in rural areas. The Active Ingredients: Sodium Propionate, Gentian Violet, Acriflavine,

Inactive Ingredients:
Water, Isopropyl alcohol, Urea, Glycerine, Sodium hydroxide.

ACV Helping Bladder Infection in Dog

Mon, 18 Jul 16 17:12:31 -0700
Posted by Sherry (Venice, Fl) on 07/18/2016
5 out of 5 stars

My three yr old doxie mix had some blood in her urine. She's had bladder stones before that resulted in an expensive operation. Thinking it was either that (again) or a uti I started searching the internet for natural resources, because a expensive vet bill was just not in the card right now. I came upon this site, read many reviews, and started giving her ACV. WOW! In one day it was nearly cleared up. In two days, so far, I've seen no blood. Thank you all for the good advice!

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  Re: Turmeric for Tumors

Mon, 18 Jul 16 16:43:36 -0700
Posted by Melanie (Illinois) on 07/18/2016

Hi Linda! How long did it take for the cyst to shrink after giving your dog castor oil and turmeric? Mine also has one growing on his upper eyelid and it got infected so now he's on antibiotics but it seems to be getting bigger. I'm desperate for alternative options.

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  Re: Adverse Reactions to DHLPP and Rabies in Four Year Old Havenese.

Mon, 18 Jul 16 16:39:00 -0700
Posted by Suseeq (Sydney, Australia) on 07/18/2016

Vitamin c is good for taking toxins out of body.

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  Re: Apple Cider Vinegar for Fleas Not Working

Mon, 18 Jul 16 16:38:34 -0700
Posted by Suseeq (Sydney, Australia) on 07/18/2016

What a resistant lot of fleas you have: tea tree eucalyptus or penny royal oil, add to shampoo and bathe once a week, a tea made from lemon, lime, pour one pint boiling water over them, put a lid on leave overnight and spray on animal and let dry. You can add lavender as well if you want. Please report back

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  Re: Adverse Reactions to DHLPP and Rabies in Four Year Old Havenese.

Mon, 18 Jul 16 13:22:01 -0700
Posted by Theresa Donate
(Mpls., Mn) on 07/18/2016

Hey Lm,

You might try adding activated charcoal- loose or easier to dose tablets - to Bella's food for a few days to help her detox. Also homeopathic Thuja in a crisis dose [initial frequent dosing as indicated on package label] may help Bella. Focus on keeping her hydrated rather than fed at this point, and consider dosing activated charcoal in doggy pedialyte if she has no interest in taking the tablets hidden in a tasty treat. Please report back!

Adverse Reactions to DHLPP and Rabies in Four Year Old Havenese.

Mon, 18 Jul 16 08:19:06 -0700
Posted by Lm (Clinton, Mi) on 07/18/2016
0 out of 5 stars

Bella is a four year old Havenese mix breed, about 9 lbs. Three days ago I took her to get her rabies vac and they also gave her the combo vac called DHLPP-C. This is for distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parainfluenza and parvovirus. She whimpered excessively immediately after shots were given, and was very shaky for hours following. Over the last three days she is not herself, has vomited twice, had diarrhea, yelps out in pain, shakes, lost her appetite, very lethargic. Last night she cried for over an hour. I am waiting to hear back from vet, who is out of town, to see what I can do to help her. I am feeling so guilty that I didn't ask any questions about what vaccines she was getting and why, as I now know the DHLPP is not required. Any suggestions for readers would be appreciated.

Colloidal Silver for Dog's Hot Spots

Mon, 18 Jul 16 08:12:12 -0700
Posted by Daffodil (British Columbia, Canada) on 07/18/2016
5 out of 5 stars

Sprayed colloidal silver on my dog's hot spot throughout the day for 5 days and it was healed. It was about 3" in diameter as it grows quickly when they lick it. He had to wear a hood to prevent licking and enlarging the spot. The vet wanted to do surgery and cut the whole area out.

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  Re: Apple Cider Vinegar for Fleas

Mon, 18 Jul 16 08:07:49 -0700
Posted by Theresa Donate
(Mpls., Mn) on 07/18/2016

20 years ago I had many cats who went in and out - and in the fall fleas jumped on my many cats and hitched a ride indoors to wait out the winter - not fun! And since my cats lived everywhere in the house, everywhere needed to be treated - this is what I did.

I used food grade Diatomaceous Earth (DE) - it is light and cheap and 10 pounds will last you decades. I started with my bed room - I stripped the bed, and dusted the room wearing a face mask. I worked - pounded - the DE into the crevices of the mattress, under the mattress, into the floor boards, against the wall where the wooden molding edges the floor - everywhere; the room was one billowing cloud of dust when I left and closed the door. I let it sit for 25 hours, and in the mean time I used another bedroom. Once I had established a 'ground zero' I stood the mattress up and gently beat off the excess DE and again the room was a dust bowl. I gave it a few hours and let the dust settle and then gently swept up the excess, leaving plenty behind in the cracks and crevices in both the mattress and the floor boards. The floor was still very dusty - you could feel it on your feet if you walked bear foot. I then laundered the bedding and dried it thoroughly and back on the bed; no cats were allowed to sleep on the bed during this process, as to avoid re-infesting the room. I then did the second room and created another 'ground zero' space. Into this now cleared room went freshly flea bathed cats with sanitized liter boxes and all fresh laundered kitty bedding. The cats were not allowed to leave this room until treatment was completed. Then room by room I did the same - I dusted the couch cushions and put them into large plastic bags, dust and all, and let them sit for 24-48 hours. I had to put a bag over the electronics to avoid getting DE dust in them as it is very hard on moving parts. I left the DE sit for 24-48 hours, and in the mean time washed every piece of bedding, every rug, anything the cats could encounter. I had carpeting in one room and I sprinkled the DE on and worked it deep into the carpet fibers with a broom. Again, wear a face mask as you will be working in a billowing cloud of dust that will irritate your sinuses and mucous membranes. After the wait time/working time was up I gently swept and brushed off the carpet, taking care to leave plenty behind deep in the carpet fibers and in all floor cracks and crevices; for under the couch I didn't even bother to vacuum, I just left it down - in fact anyplace that I could not see, or had to lift up furniture to get under, I just left the DE down. Doing all laundry at the same time is crucial, so I bagged up items until I could process them. A proper flea bath is crucial to the process as well. I used dish soap, starting with the cat in a dry bath tub [clip claws before you start] and started with soapy water and a wash cloth at the nose and worked from the nose outward; once I had the head and behind the ears saturated with the soapy water I then went on to the next cat. When all of the cats' heads were treated I filled the tub and did the bodies, again in the dish soapy water. I then drained the tub and used clear water with a cup of white vinegar to remove all traces of the dish soap and to balance the PH of the skin to avoid drying. You could see the fleas as black specks as the water drained. I followed up by blow drying the cats and flea coming. It was work, I was persistent, and the cats hated it, but I got them clean and clear and into the holding room they went while the rest of the house was treated. I want to say it took me 4 days to get the house treated and before I could release the cats. The basement and attic were not used by the cats so they were not treated. I did not have to treat the house again ever - and 10 years later I still found DE in the floor cracks. I made a point to stop letting the cats out in the late summer and fall until the first frost. I also dusted the cats with DE by putting them in a sack with DE - the head was out but it was snug at the neck so the cat was dusting ala 'shake-n-bake' style. By not letting them out during prime flea-hitch-a-ride-inside time, and by dusting the cats in the fall, plus the initial house debugging, I never had a problem again. I have since moved to a more rural location and have only 2 cats, and experienced fleas in my first year at the new house. I learned about the lamp flea traps and deployed 4-5 of them with great success: I firmly believe the lamp trap is easier to use, far less labor intensive, and just as effective as dosing the entire house in DE - or any other sprinkled substance. Now if I see my cat twitching the hair on her back as if she has the heebie jeebies, I dust the cat ala shake-n-bake style, and turn on the lamp traps.

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  Re: Apple Cider Vinegar for Fleas Not Working

Mon, 18 Jul 16 08:05:35 -0700
Posted by Terryjourney (Springfield, Or) on 07/17/2016

I have saturated it many times. It does not deter them, not at all.

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  Re: Garlic

Mon, 18 Jul 16 08:04:28 -0700
Posted by Terry Journey (Springfield, Or) on 07/17/2016

My vet told me to stop using garlic as he says it builds up in the system and can cause problems…that you do NOT have to give large doses.

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  Re: Apple Cider Vinegar for Fleas

Mon, 18 Jul 16 07:27:26 -0700
Posted by Barbara (Aiken, South Carolina) on 07/18/2016

I am in a similar predicament as you. I have a multi cat household and for the first time in fifteen years my kitties and little house are infested. I have no carpets or rugs.

I am using cedar spray on floors and baseboards and organic apple cider vinegar/water spray on cats and white vinegar/water spray on stuffed furniture and floors and baseboards. I too have to get under furniture and in closets. The veterinarian said vacuuming is a major part. He sold me pyrithrine house spray, but after reading the label, there is no way I could use it safely.

Washing cats in pure soap liquid and organic apple cider vinegar. Spraying OACV/water in between.

Just set out one plate and light trap. I only see living fleas on cat bedding.

I have always been hesitant about spot on treatments and I use them, but they stopped working suddenly. Used now they do absolutely nothing.

Going to try the OACV in drinking water.

This is alarming.

How are you using baking soda? Do you use salt and borax in crevices?

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  Re: Blue Kote for Tumors

Mon, 18 Jul 16 07:24:18 -0700
Posted by Diane (Southern Ca.) on 07/17/2016

Hi Patricia,

The Blu Kote stains but only for awhile.

I used to get some purple on my finger and the stain didn't last long. Sorry I don't know much else about this product. Only that it worked on the dog's tumor on her paw and you better ask if it can be used on a cat.

I notice that some products that are good for dogs and not good for cats. Blu Kote is great on wounds for dogs and other farm animals. My neighbor's males dogs got into a bad fight and one dog had a nasty wound on it's leg and my husband sprayed Blu Kote on the bad wound and it healed nicely.

Borax Solution Brings Great Relief to Older Dog with Mange

Mon, 18 Jul 16 07:18:08 -0700
Posted by Suzanne (Huntington, New York) on 07/17/2016
5 out of 5 stars

Thank you Thank you for this simple remedy for treating my dogs sarcoptic mange. Our Vet wanted to treat my 10 1/2 yr old pup with a 2nd round of toxic meds. 1st round didn't work at all. I just couldn't do it. I felt in my heart that it was too damaging to my dog's health. My poor pup was scratching frantically! She was stinky and losing fur. She was becoming nervous, withdrawn and sad. The scratching was driving us crazy too. I followed your directions, bathed the dog and covered her with the Borax solution. Air dried. WOW!!! What a difference that 1st night. She actually had a peaceful sleep and so did we. Still some scratching the next day but a HUGE difference. A miracle. Applied the 2nd treatment a few days later. She is starting to get back to her old self...energetic, playful and hungry. Going to keep treating her with this solution until I feel she is completely cured. Why didn't the Vet offer this simple solution that is non-toxic for my dog? What a shame that others don't know about this. Thanks again!!!!

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